Scribbler in Seville

Torrijos 2013: a picture post

Devotees (or the merely curious, like us), head for the chapel to see the visiting Virgin, and the Christ statue.

Devotees (or the merely curious, like us), head for the Hacienda’s chapel to see the visiting Virgin, and the Christ statue.

Another year, another Romeria de Torrijos in the village where we live. For weeks beforehand, the horses and oxen are trained and prepared in the fields around our house, carriages practise-driven, carretas decorated in brightly coloured tissue paper, and of course flamenca dresses and accessories sought out, examined and donned.

This year was perfect weather – blue skies, but not too hot. We missed the procession of ox-carts due to a prior social engagement, but stayed later to make up for it. I’m always intrigued by the chapel of the Hacienda de Torrijos, the Arab-era estate where the romeria takes place.

An image of Jesus was supposedly discovered 400 years ago by a hen pecking near the chapel wall, a dubious event related in a tiled niche. But enough to convince the faithful/supersitious/gullible (delete as appropriate) creyentes, who leave small silver offerings – arms, legs, cows, horses – to ask the Son of God to cure their, and their livestock’s, ailments – as well as messages of thanks.

I will leave the rest of the photos (and captions) to speak for themselves. Hasta la proxima!

Clapping hands in time to the song, as men play the guitar. Romerias are about friendship, feasting and flamenca.

Clapping and singing, as men play the guitar. Romerias are about friendship, feasting and flamencas.

A typically animated group enjoying their lunch, with the Hacienda de Torrijos behind them.

A tableau of romeros enjoying their lunch, with the Hacienda de Torrijos behind them.

This way you can't lose your glass when you move around visiting groups of friends, while at the same time displaying your football allegiance.

This way you can’t lose your glass when you move around visiting groups of friends, while at the same time displaying your football allegiance.

Horsemanship starts young in Valencina, and obviously he has to look the part, in his traje corto and Cordobes hat.

Horsemanship starts young in Valencina, and obviously he has to look the part, in his beautiful traje corto and Cordobes hat.

When my daughter lost her new balloon (dalmatian with turqoise collar), only candy floss could cushion the blow.

When my daughter lost her new helium balloon (dalmatian with turqoise collar) to gravity, only candy floss could cushion such a terrible blow. My son’s bubble gun was more grounded, thankfully.

I love the way the sunlight falls on these horses' arses (so to speak).

I love the way the sunlight falls on these horses’ arses (so to speak).

A horse-drawn cart kicks up dust crossing a field.

A horse-drawn cart kicks up dust crossing a field.

My daughter Lola poses with some romeros - pilgrims (Chaucer overtones make that word sound so wrong in English).

My daughter Lola poses with some romeros – pilgrims (the medieval overtones make that word sound so wrong in English).

This hibiscus flower is the new fashion for flamenca hair accessories.

This hibiscus-style flower is the new fashion for flamenca hair accessories.

Entrance through the left arch, exit on the right - the chapel of Hacienda de Torrijos

Entrance through the left arch, exit on the right – the chapel of Hacienda de Torrijos

Huge exotic shell looks incongruous against the azulejos of the chapel entrance.

Huge exotic seashell looks incongruous against the azulejos of the chapel entrance.

Little silver ofrendas to give thanks to Cristo de Torrijos for curing feet, legs and hands.

Little silver ofrendas to give thanks to Cristo de Torrijos for curing limbs and extremities.

The story of how the image of Cristo de Torrijos was found - by a hen!

The story of how the image of Cristo de Torrijos was found insde this very wall – by a hen!

10 thoughts on “Torrijos 2013: a picture post

  1. mmtread

    Man, this reminds me so much of Mexico (with the people not so indigena). Not surprising, I suppose, but it’s so much more like Latin America than here in Catalunya. (Except for the parades, parties, and fireworks, which seem to be más o menos incesante. See how I’m getting into the local lingo? I still can’t decide if I should start with Catalan or Castellano, so I’m using a bit of both. Actually, when I speak to people it’s usually an atrocious mix of Italian with a smattering of Spanish and Catalan thrown in. At a parking garage the other day, when I had trouble with the exit gate, I rang the buzzer and told the woman, “La macchina non funziona.” She got the idea.) Looks like a marvelous festival. And thanks for turning me on to Josh – I’m really enjoying his site. Cheers!

    1. Fiona Flores Watson

      How fascinating that our romeria reminds you of Mexico – it is the mood rather than the clothes? Do they wear flamenco dresses in Mexico? I remember the clothes there being very colourful and amazing when I travelled around 20-odd years ago. Sounds like you’re making yourself understood perfectly up there in Catalunya 😉 Josh is, as my Mum would say, a card. I love the sneaky insight he gives me into life as a living-it-large 20-something single expat, handy for an over-the-hill 40-something mum!! BTW Sorry for major fail on entering your photo competition, despite the extended deadline – bit flat-out at the moment. Could you do another one after Christmas? I will try to drop by and vote, por lo menos.

  2. Kaley

    “Romerias are about friendship, feasting and flamencas.” Same is true in the north of Spain, minus the flamencas! 😉 Your children, do they love this?

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