Scribbler in Seville

Snapshots from El Rocio 2014

This rociera has a peineta dedicated to the Virgen de las Marismas.

This rociera has a peineta (comb) dedicated to the Virgen del Rocio, adored focus of Spain’s biggest pilgrimage.

Oranges tied to a simpecado (float carrying an image of the Virgin del Rocio), with ribbon in Andalucian and Spanish colours.

Oranges tied to a simpecado (ox-drawn float carrying an image of the Virgin del Rocio), with ribbon in Andalucian and Spanish colours.

La Paloma Blanca, the White Dove - another name for the Virgen del Rocio.

La Paloma Blanca, the White Dove – another name for the Virgen del Rocio.

The pregon, who shouts out the Virgen chants - "Viva la Virgen del Rocio!"

The pregon, who shouts out the Virgen chants – “Viva la Virgen del Rocio!” – outside the church. The large brown bulk on the right is the ox, which pulls the simpecado cart, with its driver.

Walking staff with ribbon to show which town the rociero comes from, with some rosemary tucked in the top.

Walking staff with ribbon to show which town the rociero comes from, with some rosemary tucked in the top.

This carreta even has a matching upstairs bedroom window.

This carreta even has a matching upstairs bedroom window.

Every year I can, I scoot off with my trusty camera to capture the rocieros as they set off on Spain’s biggest annual pilgrimage to a small town in Huelva province – El Rocio.

As many others have affirmed, this romeria has a debatable religious element, with a large dose of fiesta fervour. Most genuinely adore the Virgin de las Marismas, as she is also known (as well as La Paloma Blanca), but for some it’s more the idea of a week-long drinking, dancing and everything-else-you-can-think-of session which attracts. I don’t care what they get up to, personally, as long as they treat the poor animals (horses, mules and oxen) used for carrying and pulling, responsibly – but sadly they don’t always, as around 15-20 die each year, a unpleasant aspect of the event which is garnering increasing publicity and controversy.

Here are some images from this year’s vintage, as the various hermandades (brotherhoods) set off on the Spain’s largest romeria: typical sights like the brightly-coloured frocks in the sunshine, and the pretty carrozas (gypsy caravans), but also some views and perspectives you may not have seen, and details which I found interesting.

Three flowers

Three flowers – and a bit of extra foliage, just for good measure.

This shot is blurred, but you can see the face of the Virgen del Rocio on this lady's peineta (comb).

This shot is blurred, but you can see the face of the Virgen del Rocio on this lady’s peineta (comb).

Hair decorations for El Rocio are more rustic than for the Feria - a sprig of rosemary with wildflowers, and a sunflower (currently flowering all over Andalucia).

Hair decorations for El Rocio are often more rustic than for the Feria – ears of wheat, a sprig of rosemary, wildflowers, and a sunflower (currently glowing in fields all over Andalucia).

 

Santa Rufina and Santa Justa, two of Seville's patron saints, with the Giralda.

Santa Rufina and Santa Justa, two of Seville’s patron saints, with the Giralda. On the roof of the simpecado of the Seville El Rocio Hermandad.

 

 

A colourful romeria scene - girls with their carrozas and bright dresses in the plaza in front of the Giralda.

A colourful romeria scene – girls with their bright flamenco dresses and carrozas (gypsy wagons) in the plaza in front of the Giralda.

Line of prettily decorated gypsy wagons next to the Giralda.

Line of prettily decorated gypsy wagons next to the Giralda.

Carrozas passing the Moorish Torre del Oro, by the river.

Carrozas passing the Moorish Torre del Oro, by the river.

The effort women put into making themselves look good here in Spain has never been under question, but for El Rocio, the hair accessories which the rocieras use to decorate their barnets can be especially creative. Whether they look good after tramping the 80km from Seville to El Rocio – through rivers and across the countryside, camping out at night, for three days in the heat – is another matter. But as they left Seville and surroundings towns, the level of artistry was impressive.

A major tradition such as El Rocio pilgrimage is composed of many details and moments, one of which is the pregon – like a crier – who calls out in adoration of the Virgin.

This is the chant the pregon shouts as the image of the Virgin images visit significant locations such as local churches, or in the case of Seville the Town Hall, before setting off for El Rocio (he is answered by the rocieros – with a resounding “Viva!”). Each time I heard it, by the time I’d got my camera onto the video setting, they’d finished.

“Viva la Virgen del Rocio! Viva!
“Viva la Paloma Blanca! Viva!
Viva la Reina de la Marismas! Viva!
Viva la Pastora Divina! Viva
Viva la Madre de Dios! Viva!”

Long live the Virgin del Rocio!
Long live the White Dove!
Long live the Queen of the Marshes!
Long live the Hold Shepherdess!
Long live the Mother of God!

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