Scribbler in Seville

Domingo de Ramas: La Paz in the park

Semana Santa, Sevilla, procession, Maria Luisa Park

Two boys watch from a perfect vantage point as the Virgin of La Sed arrives at Plaza de España.

Semana Santa, Sevilla

These military-style uniforms for the mounted band of La Paz are typical of the pageantry that is Semana Santa in Seville.

Semana Santa, Sevilla, procession, Maria Luisa park

Check out the “tails” of these helmets.

Semana Santa, Sevilla, procession, Maria Luisa park

The Cruz de Guia, carried by nazarenos from La Sed, which marks the official beginning of the procession.

Children ask for sweets from a nazareno - "Nazarena, dame un caramelo!"

Children ask for sweets from a nazareno – “Nazareno, dame un caramelo!”

Nazarenos start young, and junior to them are monaguillos, or altar boys, who carry baskets of sweets to give out to children along the procession route.

Nazarenos start young, and junior to them are monaguillos, or altar boys, who carry baskets of sweets to give out to children along the procession route.

Plaza de España, Seville, Sevilla, Semana Santa

Nazarenos approaching Plaza de España – you can see one of its towers of the right.

The first procession to go out in Semana Santa (Holy Week) here in Seville is La Paz, on the afternoon of Domingo de Ramos (Palm Sunday). Dressed in long white robes and tall, pointed hoods with eye-holes – nazarenos; and the same white robes, without hoods but carrying black crosses – penitentes; the long snaking line of 1700 cofradia participants takes an hour to go past.

Jesus paso of La Paz passes Plaza de España. Sevillian extravagance from the early 20th century.

Jesus paso of La Paz passes the central area of Plaza de España: two examples of Sevillian extravagance – the baroque float with its richly-robed statues, and the supremely majestic neo-mudejar building – both from the first half of the 20th century.

The two highlights for thousands of people who, like me, had come to watch La Paz with friends and family, are the two pasos (floats) – one of Jesus de la Victoria, accompanied by the familiar Roman centurion with white feathered helmet, on a baroque gilded base which shone dazzlingly in the bright sunshine; and the other of Nuestra Señora de la Paz, the Virgin Mary under an intricate palio (pillared canopy) on a float of shining silver adorned with white flowers. This Virgin is well-known for the olive branch she carries – a sign of peace.

Semana Santa, Sevilla, Procession, Maria Luisa Park

Penitentes of La Paz carry their crosses through Maria Luisa Park on a glorious Sunday in April.

The first part of their route goes through Maria Luisa Park, which celebrates its centenary this year – it was created for the Ibero-American Expo of 1929, originally planned for 1914 but delayed by war and other factors.

Semana Santa, Plaza de España, Seville, Sevilla

Virgin de la Paz under her curtained palio (canopy).

The procession passes Plaza de España, one of the city’s most spectacular monuments and the centrepiece for Expo 29. This semi-circular sweep of bricks and tiled arches is a suitable backdrop of magnificence and grandeur for the dazzling religious statues with their carved decorations, fresh flowers and embroidered gowns.

Semana Santa, Sevilla, procession, Maria Luisa Park, costalero

These fellows, some considerably heftier than others, bear the weight of the pasos on their shoulders – they’re called costaleros. It’s hot and exhausting work, so these guys are taking a well-earned break. Note their corset-belts.

Plaza de España, Seville, Sevilla, Semana Santa

Penitentes passing Plaza de España.

I must state that my interest in the Semana Santa processions, is not a religious or spiritual one; it is more a case of appreciating the sense of theatre and passion which goes into them, and with which they’re received. For me, it’s about how people – in this case, Sevillanos – perceive their beloved effigies, as they are borne by men called costaleros from the church of their barrio to the cathedral, and back again. On this particular occasion, it was more of a nice day out in a beautiful park than any close allegiance to these statues – at least, that was my impression. Watching La Esperanza de Triana return to her church at the end of the Madrugada yesterday afternoon – well, that was an entirely different experience, ambience, crowd.

Over the past week I have taken over 1,000 photos of Semana Santa – I watched many pasos in landmark spots all over the city. So watch out for more posts with images of Holy Week processions over the coming days.

%d bloggers like this: