Festive Seville: Mapping and Food Fairs

Happy New Year to all my lovely readers! I hope you had a wonderful festive season, spending lots of time with your friends and family.

A couple of posts ago, I listed all the events that were going on in Seville over the Christmas period.

Although it feels odd still to be talking about last month, I thought it would be fitting to report back on how they all went. I will try to avoid to less obviously festive aspects of our adventures, as I don’t know about you, but I have a serious dose of the January post-Christmas blues.

Flower-covered facade of Ayuntamiento.

Flowers projected onto the rear facade of the Ayuntamiento.

Ayuntamiento, mapping

Meccano construction on the Town Hall.

The Mapping

This is a (free) show of 3D-laser video projections on the rear facade of the Ayuntamiento (town hall), watched in Plaza San Francisco. This was not as imaginative or spectacular as last year’s, which also had more detail and was more technically impressive, and I thought it seemed longer too. However it had some great set pieces, like the Scalextric track with cars racing (video below, quite loud – be warned!), and the sweeping tour of some of Seville’s monuments: Plaza de España, the Atarazanas, Torre del Oro, and Triana Bridge (video also below). But there was no fake snow at the end, alas.

Scalextric section

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=776TXAWFNCg&w=420&h=315]

Seville monuments (watch from 9:20)

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JRGThE5aaQ&w=560&h=315]

The markets

We managed to get to three food markets, the first two of which are annual events, so they’ll be on again next Christmas.

The location of convents which make and sell pastries around Seville. Most have their own shops, and many bakeries stock their goodies too.

The location of convents which make and sell pastries around Seville. Most have their own shops, and many bakeries stock their goodies too.

We started off with the convent pastries in the Alcazar, made by nuns in 24 religious establishments located around Seville province. These include seven in the city (see map above), and one in Estepa, which is particularly famous for its mantecados.

What a magnificent setting for such dainty confections, with the colourful tiles and high ceilings of the palace’s long Renaissance salons, which were lined with tables piled high with pretty white and pink boxes.

mantecados, polvorones, Christmas, Alcazar, Navedad

Sweet treats: convent pastries on sale at the Alcazar.

These traditional Christmas shortbread-type biscuits have wonderful names like huesos de santos (saints’ bones) and coquitas de la Habana (little coconuts from Havana). Thankfully they weren’t all laden with pig fat – manteca (lard) is one of the main ingredients of crumbly polvorones (also known as mantecados); some came in vegetarian versions too. Other ingredients typically include egg and sugar, with some spice or pine nuts.

The annual Seville Province Gastronomy and Handicrafts Fair.

The annual Seville Province Gastronomy and Handicrafts Fair.

We briefly visited the Provincia de Sevilla craft and gastronomy fair, held in the patio of the Diputacion (Provincial Government, one of four levels of government in Spain – over-stuffed civil service? really?). This always takes place over the last two weekends before Christmas.

In a crowded, covered space, the average age of visitors seemed to be around 60, so two small, rampaging children intent on running everywhere at high speed, were a dangerous addition to the mix. Before retreating to a less risky area, we spotted lots of delicious local goodies, some of which were taken to the UK as Christmas presents.

Bodegas Salado's cava was popular with the crowd at the Seville Province fair.

Bodegas Salado’s cava was popular with the crowd at the Seville Province fair.

Among the stands of Seville-made produce, we saw olive oil, honey (orange blossom, rosemary and eucalyptus), cheese, embutidos (sausages), and wine. Bodegas Salado, in nearby Umbrete, make a variety of wines, including a cava. Their stand was mobbed by thirsty pensioners desperate for a free copa de vino. But I managed to elbow my way in and try some. Not Catalan, but perfectly acceptable. This bodega offers tours – on my list for 2014.

Spanish food, Portuguese food, Santa Cruz

Spanish-Portuguese food and craft market in Santa Cruz.

Then we moved on to another food market, this time in the patio of a school in barrio Santa Cruz. This was organised by EuroAAA, the Euro-region of Andalucia-Algarve-Alentejo (southern Spain and Portugal). In a large, open space, this was much better for the kids, who could charge around without annoying anyone – there was even a face painter!

Little Portuguese cheeses, a snip at 1 euro each.

Little Portuguese cheeses, a snip at 1 euro each.

We got some delicious little Portguese cheeses, as served with bread and butter as an appetizer at many Algarve restaurants (although no sardine pate, sadly); Flor de Sal, prime sea salt, produced in the salt flats at Castro Marim, just over the Portuguese border (as always, the Portuguese owner of Agua Mae, Luis, spoke excellent English); and Monte Robledo cheese, a tangy favourite from the Sierra de Aracena, made of goat’s and sheep’s milk and rolled in rosemary, oregano or paprika.

Riding a camel on the Alameda. As you do.

Riding a camel on the Alameda. As you do.

Nothing like a good, old-fashioned funfair ride to fill a small person with seasonal joy

Nothing like a good, old-fashioned funfair ride to fill a small person with seasonal joy.

We also did the camel ride in the Alameda (the Reyes arrive on camels, so they’re a big part of Christmas here). They take three children each, one of the hump and one either side. This was a huge success, despite (or perhaps because of) the half-hour wait; and we couldn’t resist some funfair rides too. The colour and excitement, and exotic treats like riding a “ship of the desert”, are such a wonderful part of Christmas for kids. Seeing the delight on their faces is present enough for me.

What we didn’t manage to see/do: ice-skating at the Prado or the Setas (son); the Mudejar Belen at the Palacio de los Marqueses de la Algaba - a model of Seville in post-Moorish times (me). Next year!

Coming up in next blog posts: the Norfolk coast, and the Cabalgata de los Reyes in Gines.

What to do in Seville during the December Puente – and over Christmas

navidad, navidades, Christmas, Christmas lights

Typically understated lights on Avenida de la Constitucion.

Christmas, Navidad

One of the fabulous bell-stars (not to be confused with the 1980s all-girl pop group) on Calle Sierpes.

This weekend is a bank holiday in Spain – a double one, with two (legitimate) days off – today, Friday, and Monday. First, Dia de la Constitucion (6 December), celebrating Spain’s Constitution; then Dia la Concepcion Inmaculada (8 December) – a Sunday, which is carried over to Monday 9 December.

Traditionally, the Christmas buzz gets going after this puente, but in Seville it’s already happening now thanks to a broad range of events - some regular annual ones, and some new. In any case, the Christmas lights are already up, so make sure you make at least one visit in the evening to get the full festive effect.

Here I will list my pick of the markets and other attractions this puente, and in most cases, throughout the Christmas season until Reyes – 5 January.

MARKETS AND FAIRS

I love a good browse – especially when there’s so much variety on offer. You can get all your Christmas presents here – books, handicrafts, food, wine. Chatting to the owner/designer/maker of a piece is all part of the experience.

dulces, claustros, dulce, navidad

Convent pastries, made by nuns in Seville province.

Convent pastries market in the Alcazar – 6 – 8 December.
Get your Christmas yemas and lardy goodies - mantecados and polvorones – made by nuns from nearby convents. Some are available in vegetarian versions too. An essential part of the seasonal diet for many Spanish.

Antique book market – Plaza Nueva – until 9 December
Great for quirky presents for hispanophiles; as well as books, you can find postcards, prints, maps, posters and comics.

belen, belens, nativity scenes, nativity figures, nativity, feria del belen

Fish stall at the Feria del Belen (nativity scene fair). They’re half the size of your finger.

belen, belenes, nativity scenes

Colourful Mexican belen. Stand 14, Oscar Lazarte. He also has some wonderful Cuban and Peruvian figures, including Noah’s Ark.

belen, belenes, nativity

Houses for your nativity scene.

Feria del Belen – Nativity scene market – Avenida de la Constitucion – until 23 December
Come here for figures for your belen (nativity scene) – most homes, offices and shops have their own. Rivers with flowing water, all the complementary figures including the cagon (pooing man), and foodstuffs – mini-fish and legs of jamon (widely available in Jewish Bethlehem in 0AD), to complement Jesus, Mary and Joseph with the animals, shepherds, and three kings.

Christmas market – the Alameda – until 5 January
This market features children’s attractions, ponies, dromedaries, and a Grand Flea Circus. Slightly apprehensive about the animals’ treatment; have yet to see.

NAvidad, Christmas

The super-sparkly Ayuntamiento (Town Hall) in Plaza Nueva, where the book and handicrafts markets are held.

Handicrafts market – Plaza Nueva – 13 December – 5 January
Great for unusual Christmas and Reyes presents – stalls mostly belong to designer-makers. Good buys (though less portable) include handmade ceramics and wooden toys.

Gastronomy and Handicrafts of Seville Province Fair – Diputacion de Sevilla – 12- 15, 19-22 December
Find gifts here for foodie friends and family – look out for Ines Rosales tortas de aceite, Colonias de Galeon organic wines from the Sierra Norte, and extra virgin olive oil from Estepa (Oleoestepa) and Carmona (Basilippo).

Independent designers market – Muchomaskemarket – El Arenal – 14-15 December
This two-day event takes place at a co-working space in Cuesta del Rosario 8 (4o) and features 29 stands of fashion, gastronomy and interiors, including recycled materials and cakes. Also workshops – learn how to make baby shoes out of felt, and how to print textiles.

Christmas market with live Nativity Scene – Plaza Encarnacion – until 6 January
Go skating, buy some presents, visit the animals at the Belen Viviente.

SPORT

Whether you’re a wobbler like me, or an elegant glider, skating is fun. And when it’s in such beautiful surroundings as these, even more so. And when it’s followed by a well-earned copita or three with friends – well, that’s a top evening in my book.

Ice rinks – until 6 January
In the Prado de San Sebastian and Plaza Encarnacion. For opening times, see here. The one under the Setas is interesting because it’s ecological synthetic ice, made by local Sevillano company Xtraice.

CULTURE

The programme is less varied at this time of year, as the spotlight falls on seasonal concerts, but there are some star events.

Sara Baras in her flamenco show La Pepa - one of the many highlights in Seville this Christmas.

Sara Baras in her flamenco show La Pepa – one of the many events in Seville this Christmas.

Flamenco – Sara Baras – Fibes – 13 December
The innovative dancer brings her new show, La Pepa, to the Seville Conference Centre. Set in Cadiz city in 1810-1812 – the time of the historic First Constitution and War of Independence against France – it also stars bailaor Jose Serrano. More information: Fibes.

Handel’s Messiah – Maestranza Theatre - 19 and 20 December
The great choral work performed by local amateur choral associations – a “from scratch”. Humming along is positively encouraged. More information: Teatro Maestranza.

Quidam – Cirque du Soleil – Palacio de Deportes San Pablo - 18-22 December
If you’ve never experienced a Cirque du Soleil show, I’d highly recommend this – a unique combination of music, dance, theatre and circus acrobatics. Thrilling and great fun, and worth the hike to San Pablo. More information: Cirque du Soleil.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uc9lUuJQpE&w=560&h=315]

OTHER EVENTS
Finally, two free events/experiences to round off your Christmas visit to Seville, whether it’s a quick visit of a few hours, a weekend break, or you live here and want to try out everything that’s on offer. 

EVOO, AOVE, olive oil, extra virgin oilve oil

The four types of olive oil on offer, from smooth arbequina to strong picual.

Tasting the olive oil, at the mobile catas around the city this and next weekend.

Tasting the olive oil, at the mobile catas around the city this and next weekend.

Olive Oil Tasting Carts – all over the centre – 5-7, 12-14 December
Nothing to do with Christmas, but a great initiative worth mentioning. All around the centre, from Plaza Encarnacion down to Plaza Juan de Austria, you can find 50 carts each offering four types of EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) to taste; the idea is to introduce people to the delights of distinct varieties. They’re in place from 10.30am to 2.30pm and you can see a list of all the carts’ locations here. I’m a big fan of picual, having seen it being made on a farm in Jaen where I stayed recently; you can also taste smooth arbequina, peppery cornicabra, and fruity hojiblanca. I love this mobile cata idea; you are also given a brochure containing recipes using each type of oil to try at home. I’m tempted by the buñuelos de bacalo.

Mapping – Plaza San Francisco – until 5 December
This fabulous laser show is projected onto the back of the Ayuntamiento building. Dates aren’t 100% confirmed yet, but this year’s show, “El Espiritu de Navidad” (The Spirit of Christmas), will probably kick off on Tuesday 10 December, until Reyes (5 January); last year they were every hour from 6pm to 11 or 12pm. One of the Christmas season’s most popular events, with 700,000 watching the show last year, which won a European Best Event Award. (No, I’ve never heard of them either – no matter. Awards are a Good Thing.) Here’s a taster from last year.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrHuF0Lyheg&w=420&h=315]

What do they do in your town or village at Christmas? Here’s a listing for Granada by Molly.

Torrijos 2013: a picture post

Devotees (or the merely curious, like us), head for the chapel to see the visiting Virgin, and the Christ statue.

Devotees (or the merely curious, like us), head for the Hacienda’s chapel to see the visiting Virgin, and the Christ statue.

Another year, another Romeria de Torrijos in the village where we live. For weeks beforehand, the horses and oxen are trained and prepared in the fields around our house, carriages practise-driven, carretas decorated in brightly coloured tissue paper, and of course flamenca dresses and accessories sought out, examined and donned.

This year was perfect weather – blue skies, but not too hot. We missed the procession of ox-carts due to a prior social engagement, but stayed later to make up for it. I’m always intrigued by the chapel of the Hacienda de Torrijos, the Arab-era estate where the romeria takes place.

An image of Jesus was supposedly discovered 400 years ago by a hen pecking near the chapel wall, a dubious event related in a tiled niche. But enough to convince the faithful/supersitious/gullible (delete as appropriate) creyentes, who leave small silver offerings – arms, legs, cows, horses - to ask the Son of God to cure their, and their livestock’s, ailments – as well as messages of thanks.

I will leave the rest of the photos (and captions) to speak for themselves. Hasta la proxima!

Clapping hands in time to the song, as men play the guitar. Romerias are about friendship, feasting and flamenca.

Clapping and singing, as men play the guitar. Romerias are about friendship, feasting and flamencas.

A typically animated group enjoying their lunch, with the Hacienda de Torrijos behind them.

A tableau of romeros enjoying their lunch, with the Hacienda de Torrijos behind them.

This way you can't lose your glass when you move around visiting groups of friends, while at the same time displaying your football allegiance.

This way you can’t lose your glass when you move around visiting groups of friends, while at the same time displaying your football allegiance.

Horsemanship starts young in Valencina, and obviously he has to look the part, in his traje corto and Cordobes hat.

Horsemanship starts young in Valencina, and obviously he has to look the part, in his beautiful traje corto and Cordobes hat.

When my daughter lost her new balloon (dalmatian with turqoise collar), only candy floss could cushion the blow.

When my daughter lost her new helium balloon (dalmatian with turqoise collar) to gravity, only candy floss could cushion such a terrible blow. My son’s bubble gun was more grounded, thankfully.

I love the way the sunlight falls on these horses' arses (so to speak).

I love the way the sunlight falls on these horses’ arses (so to speak).

A horse-drawn cart kicks up dust crossing a field.

A horse-drawn cart kicks up dust crossing a field.

My daughter Lola poses with some romeros - pilgrims (Chaucer overtones make that word sound so wrong in English).

My daughter Lola poses with some romeros – pilgrims (the medieval overtones make that word sound so wrong in English).

This hibiscus flower is the new fashion for flamenca hair accessories.

This hibiscus-style flower is the new fashion for flamenca hair accessories.

Entrance through the left arch, exit on the right - the chapel of Hacienda de Torrijos

Entrance through the left arch, exit on the right – the chapel of Hacienda de Torrijos

Huge exotic shell looks incongruous against the azulejos of the chapel entrance.

Huge exotic seashell looks incongruous against the azulejos of the chapel entrance.

Little silver ofrendas to give thanks to Cristo de Torrijos for curing feet, legs and hands.

Little silver ofrendas to give thanks to Cristo de Torrijos for curing limbs and extremities.

The story of how the image of Cristo de Torrijos was found - by a hen!

The story of how the image of Cristo de Torrijos was found insde this very wall - by a hen!

A (crafty) English summer fête

My son wins the spacehopper race by about a mile. Not that I'm competitive or anything.

My son wins the spacehopper race by about a mile. Not that I’m competitive or anything.

First of all, apologies to those of my dear loyal readers puzzled to see yet another post not about Seville – a perfectly reasonable expectation. The next one will return to business as usual, I assure you. The reason is we’ve only just returned from our summer sojourn in the home country – England – visiting family and friends (aging parents, high-achieving teenage nephews, county-cricket-playing godson, successful friends with good, well-paid jobs *tries not to gnash teeth*).

I love to take my Anglo-Spanish children to quintessentially English places, to do quintessentially English things – the pub, local draft bitter (OK, not quite yet). And what could be more typical of that fair isle than a summer village fête?

A fête wouldn't be complete without ice-cream. Loved this trailer selling local home-made stuff, complete with lights.

A fête wouldn’t be complete without ice-cream. Loved this trailer selling delicious home-made stuff, complete with pretty lights.

At the Bank Holiday – in the UK there’s a puente, a bank holiday, on the last Monday of August – there are many outdoors events held around the country, in gardens and parks and other green spaces. We went to the fête in a village near where my parents live, and where I grew up. A fête could be said to English version of a Spanish fiesta (fête is from the French, with the ^ indicating a lost s; I’m a sucker for etymology), but they have little in common; no dancing, no loud music, no fairground rides.

The country/style bar.

The country/style bar.

English fairs are a much more low-key and gentle experience. Before going to a Spanish fiesta, or feria (local party; each town throws their own), I brace myself for an afternoon or evening’s serious drinking and socialising: pushing though crowds to get to the dance floor, or bar, or loo; shouting over the noise; and getting used to the charged thrum of a hot, half-cut, up-for-it crowd. There’s always a bar at a fête, but the vibe is totally different.

The winning rosette. First prize he's ever won.

The winning rosette. First prize he’s ever won, so he was quite chuffed.

Zac in the tug-of-war: take the strain...

Zac in the tug-of-war: take the strain…

... and heeeeaaaavvvve!

… and heeeeaaaavvvve! (It’s best of three, hence different line-ups.)

This was an afternoon of old-fashioned, traditional fun, with hands-on activities, held on the village’s cricket pitch, where an assortment of stalls, tents and other attractions were arranged around a central sporting arena, which was marked out with a border of jolly, festive bunting and surrounded by straw bales for spectators to sit on. The general air of summer enjoyment was helped along by blue skies with fluffy clouds, providing the ideal temperature – warm (ice-cream weather, definitely), but not too hot.

My children joined in with gusto, my son winning his spacehopper race (modern version of the sack, perhaps?) by a respectable margin, and his tug-of-war too. This particular event reminded me of the Jubilee party we went to last year, where he also participated enthusiastically, narrowly avoiding being trampled by his uncle’s team mates.

Yes, that is a knife. Whatever would Health and Safety say? Well they were under a county council employee's scrutiny

Yes, that is a knife. Health and Safety alert! I felt confident since the activity was organised by a trained outdoor expert.

My daughter, being smaller, used a peeler. Both completed their task with all digits intact.

My daughter, being smaller, used a peeler. Both completed their task with all digits intact.

We missed “Guess the weight of the cake”, and “Guess how many sweets are in the jar” (saving my daughter’s teeth from a sugar-battering), and never made it to Splat the Rat (a firm favourite) or the coconut shy. But they were both quite taken with the Bushcraft stall – an area of shady ground under an ancient tree, where a charming man, Terry from Essex County Council’s Outdoors department, showed them how to make a kazoo - a small instrument you blow to make a buzzing sound. Peel a stick of willow using a knife (don’t panic, I told myself, he’s a professional), then cut it in half (ditto), scoop out a hollow, insert a strip of paper and tie it back together with elastic bands. Decorate to taste.

Bashing the stick - wearing a princess dress. As you do.

Bashing the stick – wearing a princess dress. As you do.

The finished articles - two hand-decorated, hand-made kazoos.

The finished articles – two hand-decorated, hand-made kazoos.

Terry goes around Essex schools teaching that, and other outdoorsy, Survivor-ish activities such as “fire lighting, shelter building and camp craft”, for a living. Sod ballet and football, violin and yoga – basic survival skills are where it’s at for today’s over-cosseted, screen-addicted kids.

First ever go at pottery.

Getting his hands dirty – my son’s first ever go at pottery.

An unexpected bonus at the summer fete!

The pottery stall was an unexpected bonus at the summer fête.

They also got to make (or should that be throw?) a pot using local clay. The village’s history group has built a kiln to fire bricks, a traditional industry in Essex dating back to Roman times. I couldn’t help noticing the parallel with clay from Triana here in Seville.

The finished product (she didn't write her own name, in case you hadn't guessed).

The finished product (she didn’t write her name, in case you hadn’t guessed).

Also, I loved pottery at school. I was useless at art, but pottery was fun and it didn’t matter if you were mediocre – your work was eccentric, or had character, rather than being crap (at least, that’s what my ever-diplomatic parents told me). My children’s pots will be fired in a couple of months, and displayed in the village pub; my Mum has been charged with collecting them.

Trying out a glider cockpit.

Trying out a glider cockpit…

...and a three-wheeler Morgan.

…and a three-wheeler Morgan.

Other random attractions – one of the best features of fêtes, for me, is their eclecticism – were a glider from the local club: sitting in the pilot’s seat and moving the various levers was predictably popular; some three-wheeler Morgans and veteran tanks; and the home-made jam stall. What’s unusual about that? I hear you ask – these people run to exotic combinations such as beetroot and horseradish and, for Christmas (one present done already!) spiced plum and port.

For adding bite to a bocadillo.

For adding bite to a bocadillo.

The second-hand book stall provided some contemporary fiction and a Horrid Henry book, so we felt like winners, despite losing the raffle (first prize: glider flight), name the teddy, and win a ridiculously large cuddly toy if you draw an odd-numbered ticket. We tried NINE TIMES – all evens. What are the odds of that happening? One in four-and-a-half, right? And it wasn’t even for charity. Still, if that was the only low point, the afternoon was a roaring success by my standards.

Noche de Fuego: African drums, fire-jumping and pagan madness

Noche de Fuego

Fire has both life-giving and cleansing properties and is often an element of pagan rituals.

Darkness, fire, moonlight, warmth… there’s something magical about midsummer night celebrations. Every year, on the closest Saturday to the solstice (21 June), there’s a candela (bonfire party) in a park in our village. Parque de la Gallega is on the edge of the hill overlooking Seville, so the view is of a sea of twinkling lights down below in the distance, while a gentle breeze ruffles the olive trees.

But it’s not just about the primeval, life-giving force of fire and the sultry air – there’s music too. Senegalese sabar drummers. The hypnotic beat of the West African drums, the crackling of the bonfire, the “ululululul” of the musicians singing, the low murmur of people talking – every table around the winding paths of the park was occupied by 10pm, as people settled in to have their dinner before the music started; now they’re enjoying the electric energy of these four Senegalese musicians. A semicircle forms in front of the band, who sit in a row behind their drums, their teeth and eyes glinting in the darkness.

The band -Senegalese drummers

The band – Senegalese drummers Super Tam Tam.

band front view

band laughing

band side rear view

The band members take it in turns to leave their seats and dance in the space in front of the crowd. Their wild spirit and abandon fires up the crowd, who perform their own brand of leaping and shimmying - one, the recently retired jueza (lady judge) of our village, admits happily she is borracheta - a little drunk. Even without alcohol, the atmosphere is intoxating. As the tempo speeds up, so the urgency of the movements increases. Everyone is swept up in the faster-beating drums, carried away by the chanting voices and insistent rhythms.

dancer jumping

rasta dancer

rasta dancing 2

judge

At the candela del solstice, traditions of the Noche de San Juan, the Night of St John the Baptist, only a night later (23 June), blend in with the ancient pre-Christian pagan rituals on which the Church’s festivals are based – writing your wishes on slips of paper and throwing them into the fire, and jumping over the fire too. The latter appeals to show-off macho Spanish boys. San Juan is celebrated with special fervour in seaside towns, where people run into the sea at midnight to wash away their sins.

fire jumper 2

fire jumper 1

groups bonfire

Papi kids city lights

Our kids have long since crashed out, tucked up under blankets, just a few feet away from the drummers but without stirring, and I find a friend, Diana, whose daughter is a mucker of Lola’s. We listen to the music and watch the dancing, both happy to observe rather than release our pent-up frustrations and desires in physical form, as others are doing. It looks both therapeutic and Bacchanalian.

kids asleep

me and Diana

In the darkness, I don’t recognise many people in this village where I’ve lived for nearly six years now, but it doesn’t matter. It’s a happy and inclusive vibe, where everyone is caught up by the rhythms, and once the Senegalese quartet has finished, flamenco songs start up. Naturally – how could they not?

The Noche del Fuego is organised by the Associacion Los Dolmenes.

You can watch some videos I shot here, here and here – the drummers and the dancers.